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Streams We Fish

Raven Fork Trophy Water

The Raven Fork is a 2.2 mile stretch of trophy water.   The stream contains many stocked rainbow in the 20+ inch range.  In addition, Raven Fork also has a healthy population of wild trout.  A bonus on this trip is that  anglers have a good chance of spotting an elk.  Raven Fork has good fishing access but it is fished hard.  However, patience pays off here as you have a chance at catching a fish of a lifetime.  You will need a special Cherokee tribal license to fish the trophy water. 

Tuckaseegee River

Located in the NC Trout Capital, the Tuckasegee River is a heavily stocked tailwater river.  There is plenty of room to cast on this river due to wide open, big water.  Fisherman could land the "Tuck slam" which consists of a brook, brown, and rainbow trout.  Clients have the option to wade or float depending on the water levels.  Most of the fishing on the tuck is done in the four to five mile delayed harvest section.  Trout generally average around 10-12 inches but there are lots of 18+ inch trophy trout in the tuck.

East Fork French Broad

The East Fork is a beautiful medium sized stream in the Rosman area.  The stream is easy wading and great for beginners.  The smaller nature of the stream makes casting generally shorter. The creek has a scenic waterfall and several large shoals.  Fisherman on the East Fork have the chance to catch three trout species as well as the off chance of catching a stream bred trout.

Upper Nantahala

Nantahala is Cherokee for "Land of the noon day sun".  Located above the famous whitewater rafting on the lower Nantahala, the upper Nantahala is a mid to large sized creek located in a picturesque gorge with several waterfalls.  The water most always runs crystal clear. The upper "Nanty" contains more stream born trout than most delayed harvest streams in WNC.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Small Wild Streams

WNC is fortunate to have three species of wild trout: brown, rainbow, and brook.  The southern Appalachian brook trout is the only one of the three that is native to the region. Wild trout fishing in NC can be done any time, but is most often done in summer. In the dog days of summer, some streams can be too warm for good fishing. "Blue lining," as it is often referred, is fishing on small wild trout streams in often remote areas. These streams can offer an unbelievable experience for the dry fly enthusiast. The unspoiled waters are a fly fisherman's paradise.  The wild fish tend to be on the smaller side, but they have vibrant colors and can be acrobatic fighters when hooked.  These trout are quite rewarding to catch.